News

  • Why are Grocery Stores Removing ‘Best By’ Dates?
    by Charles Haverfield on October 5, 2022 at 3:13 pm

    Consumers are confused about date codes on food labels, often causing more food waste than necessary. We can fix it, though, without compromising safety. […]

  • Best in New Food and Beverage Packaging
    by Rick Lingle , Lisa McTigue Pierce on October 5, 2022 at 1:00 pm

    StarKist Smart Bowls, bubble tea in Heinz ketchup bottles, Cadbury's bar-wrap breakthrough, PepsiCo's Día de los Muertos cans (above), Nestlé Confectionery's new wrappers. […]

  • EPA Awards $6.4M for Research to Support National Water Reuse Efforts
    by Research and Development (ORD) on October 5, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    WASHINGTON - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced research grants totaling $6.4 million to Iowa State University and the Water Research Foundation for research to support national efforts to reduce technological and institutional barriers for expanded water reuse.  “Safe and reliable water is critical to protecting public health, and innovative solutions for reusing water can improve water availability and access across the nation,” said Chris Frey, Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Research and Development. “These research projects will help advance water reuse applications so communities, local and state governments, and Tribes can provide alternatives to existing water resources.” Water reuse is the practice of reclaiming water from a variety of sources, treating it, and reusing it for beneficial purposes. It can provide alternative supplies for potable and non-potable uses to enhance water security, sustainability, and resilience. These research grants will help accelerate water innovation, information availability, and engagement. The funding will advance clean and safe water reuse goals, promote a better understanding of the nation’s water and wastewater treatment and infrastructure, and enhance the availability and efficient use of water resources through water reuse. The following institutions are receiving awards: Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, to integrate technological, institutional and regulatory decision-making processes to accelerate water reuse adoption by addressing issues in water quality and availability in small, underserved communities. The Water Research Foundation, Denver, Colo., to quantify water reuse potential across the nation while aiming to reduce biological and chemical health risk and provide stakeholders with user-friendly tools and materials to advance water reuse in communities both technologically and organizationally. Learn more information about the projects. Learn more about EPA research grants. […]

  • EPA Awards $80M in Water Infrastructure Funding to Kansas at Clean Water Act 50th Anniversary Celebration Where Missouri and Kansas Rivers Meet
    by Region 07 on October 5, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    EPA Assistant Administrator for the Office of Water Radhika Fox, EPA Region 7 Administrator Meg McCollister, and U.S. Representative Sharice Davids (KS-3) present an $80 million “big check” in Bipartisan Infrastructure Law water funding to Kansas Department of Health and Environment Secretary Janet Stanek and KDHE Deputy Secretary for Environment Leo Henning at an event at Kaw Point Park in Kansas City, Kansas, Oct. 5. This award marks the state’s first State Revolving Fund distribution allocated by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law! Left to right: Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, Mayor and CEO Tyrone A. Garner; Fox, Stanek, Davids, McCollister, and Henning. (Photo credit: U.S. EPA)LENEXA, KAN. (OCT. 5 , 2022) – Today at the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas rivers, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Assistant Administrator for the Office of Water Radhika Fox joined EPA Region 7 Administrator Meg McCollister for the Midwest stop on the Clean Water Act 50th anniversary celebration tour. “When Congress passed the Clean Water Act in 1972, with an overwhelming bipartisan majority, it charted a new path for America’s waters,” said Fox. “In the past 50 years, the Missouri and Kansas rivers, along with other treasured waterways nationally, have been transformed into spaces that drive economic growth, environmental health, and recreational access. Looking forward, we have a unique opportunity to continue protecting these rivers and invest in Kansas’ water infrastructure through the historic Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.” During the event at Kaw Point Park in Kansas City, Kansas, the EPA leaders presented an $80 million big check to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment for their State Revolving Fund (SRF). The award marks the state’s first SRF distribution funded by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. This new funding brings Kansas’ total for the year to nearly $100 million, and is the first of five annual distributions to the state from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. “The Heartland is connected by big rivers, with the Missouri River – the longest in North America – flowing through Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska,” said McCollister. “Today, we celebrate the Clean Water Act successes that have transformed our rivers into places of recreation, the historic Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding that will allow us to continue our water protections, and the community organizations that are integral to keeping our river access points clean.” U.S. Representative Sharice Davids (KS-3); Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Deputy Secretary for Environment Leo Henning; Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, Mayor and CEO Tyrone A. Garner; and local partners joined EPA to reflect on the progress under the Clean Water Act and the promise of Kansas’ historic SRF award. “From the water in our tap to the rain in our gutters, water infrastructure touches many parts of our lives. Most people don’t always realize how important those systems are until they fail, but it’s our responsibility to ensure they never get to that point,” said Davids. “I am glad to welcome funding from the bipartisan infrastructure bill to help deliver cleaner drinking water, safer stormwater systems, and better wastewater management to our communities.” “Kansas has taken its responsibility in implementing the Clean Water Act seriously since its inception in 1972,” said Henning. “We have made significant investments in our wastewater infrastructure, which grants such as this one today from EPA have made possible. As a rural state, we have had to be innovative in incentivizing management practices to reduce pollutants coming off of ag lands during runoff. While emerging issues always loom on the horizon of clean water, KDHE is positioned with strong staff, programs, and authorities to meet those challenges now and in the future. We are thankful for our partnership with Region 7, working together to improve and protect the water of Kansas in the manner intended by this Act 50 years ago.” “With great appreciation, we welcome this investment that will help sustain infrastructure designed to keep clean water on “tap” for a variety of uses in Kansas for years to come,” said Garner. Attendees also included partner organizations and community members who have collaborated through the years to clean up the Kansas and Missouri rivers and increase recreational access to these waters. EPA Region 7 bestowed certificates of appreciation to Larry O’Donnell, Little Blue River Watershed Coalition, and Vicki Richmond, Healthy Rivers Partnership, and concluded the event with a river cleanup. Background Five decades of Clean Water Act implementation have reduced direct pollution discharges to our nation’s waters and improved wastewater and stormwater infrastructure. This progress was built on strong partnerships between EPA, and state, local, and tribal governments, as well as community and environmental organizations, industry, and agriculture. As EPA continues its national tour celebrating the Clean Water Act, the Agency is also collaborating with its partners to chart a course for the next 50 years of progress for clean water. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has provided a historic investment in water infrastructure, including $12.7 billion through the SRF programs established by the 1987 amendments to the Clean Water Act. Leading up to the 50th anniversary on Oct. 18, the national tour highlights waters essential to healthy people, vibrant ecosystems, agricultural productivity, and economic growth. Other stops include Puget Sound, Florida Everglades, Chesapeake Bay, Great Lakes, Cuyahoga River, and more. # # # Learn more about EPA Region 7 View all Region 7 news releases Connect with EPA Region 7 on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @EPARegion7 […]

  • EPA Awards $3.2M Research Grant to Iowa State University
    by Region 07 on October 5, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    LENEXA, KAN. (OCT. 5, 2022) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced a $3.2 million research grant to Iowa State University to fund research that will support national efforts to reduce technological and institutional barriers for expanded water reuse. “As we celebrate the Clean Water Act’s 50th Anniversary this month, we are proud to announce a research grant that will expand water reuse adoption efforts in Iowa,” said EPA Region 7 Administrator Meg McCollister. “We’re looking forward to seeing the research performed by Iowa State University resulting in expanded water reuse and an increase in water quality and availability in underserved communities.” This grant will enable university researchers to integrate technological, institutional, and regulatory decision-making processes to accelerate water reuse adoption by addressing issues in water quality and availability in small, rural communities. The Water Research Foundation in Denver also received a grant through the Water Innovation, Science and Engagement to Advance Water Reuse Research Funding Opportunity. The total funding for these research grants is $6.4 million. “Safe and reliable water is critical to protecting public health, and innovative solutions for reusing water can improve water availability and access across the nation,” said Chris Frey, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Research and Development. “These research projects will help advance water reuse applications so communities, local and state governments, and tribes can provide alternatives to existing water resources.” Water reuse is the practice of reclaiming water from a variety of sources, treating it, and reusing it for beneficial purposes. It can provide alternative supplies for potable and non-potable uses to enhance water security, sustainability, and resilience. These research grants will help accelerate water innovation, information availability, and engagement. The funding will advance clean and safe water reuse goals, promote a better understanding of the nation’s water and wastewater treatment and infrastructure, and enhance the availability and efficient use of water resources through water reuse. Learn more about the projects. Learn more about EPA research grants. # # # Learn more about EPA Region 7 View all Region 7 news releases Connect with EPA Region 7 on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @EPARegion7​​​​​​ […]

  • EPA Announces Innovative Effort to Bring New Chemicals Used in Electric Vehicle, Semiconductor, Clean Energy Sectors to Market
    by Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP) on October 5, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    WASHINGTON - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a new effort under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) to implement a streamlined and efficient process under the New Chemicals Program to assess risk and apply mitigation measures, as appropriate, for new chemicals with applications in batteries, electric vehicles, semiconductors and renewable energy generation. Under TSCA, EPA’s New Chemicals Program plays an important role by reviewing all new chemical substances before they enter the marketplace in order to bring innovative chemistries to market in a way that does not harm human health or the environment.  “From job creation to energy security – clean energy sectors will power the future of our country,” said Assistant Administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention Michal Freedhoff. “Streamlining our review of new chemical substances that make up electric vehicle batteries and that can be used in other vital emerging markets will allow manufacturers to super-charge production, bolstering our economy and advancing the Biden-Harris Administration’s goals to protect the environment and combat the climate crisis.” The new process is for mixed metal oxides (MMOs), including new and modified cathode active materials (CAMs). MMOs are innovative chemistries and have numerous electrical applications in batteries as well as use as catalysts, adsorbents, and in ceramics. Notably, MMOs, including CAMs, are a key component in lithium-ion batteries used in electric vehicles, which are a growing and important industry. New MMOs can also be used for semi-conductors, and renewable energy generation and storage, such as solar cells and wind power turbines. They typically consist of lithium, nickel, cobalt and other metals, and they are the key material used in the production of the cathode in battery cells, which are subsequently assembled into a battery. This effort supports President Biden’s bold agenda to tackle the climate crisis, and will complement the resources flowing to EPA from historic legislation signed by the President. There are incentives attached to clean energy under the Inflation Reduction Act, including tax credits for electric vehicles. Under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, there are also incentives to build a national network of electric vehicle chargers. Like all chemical substances not listed on the TSCA Inventory, MMOs, including new and modified CAMs, are subject to section 5 of TSCA, which requires manufacturers (including importers) of new chemical substances to provide EPA with notice before initiating the activity by submitting a Premanufacture Notice (PMN). When EPA receives a PMN, TSCA requires the agency to fully assess all the potential hazards and exposures of the new chemical substance, make a determination as to whether it presents an unreasonable risk to human health or the environment, and take steps to address that risk before it can enter commerce EPA has reviewed hundreds of TSCA section 5 submissions for MMOs, including CAMs and modified CAMs, since the 1980’s. To further describe this new effort, EPA will launch outreach and training for interested stakeholders to outline the new streamlined approach to reviewing MMOs, basics of TSCA statutory and regulatory requirements, and steps for navigating the new chemicals submission process. Subscribe to OCSPP’s news releases to receive notices about upcoming webinars. Today’s announcement is supplemented with the release of a Compliance Advisory that reaffirms that new MMOs, which includes CAMs and modified CAMs, are new chemical substances subject to TSCA. Anyone who plans to manufacture (including import) a CAM or modified CAM that is not on the TSCA Inventory must comply with the TSCA section 5 new chemical requirements and implementing regulations. In January 2022, EPA launched a similar effort to streamline the review of dozens of PMNs for biofuels that could be used to displace current, higher greenhouse gas emitting transportation fuels. Under this effort, EPA has completed about 95 percent of all biofuel PMNs submitted since the initiative was announced. More information about EPA’s review of new chemicals and MMOs. […]

  • Have You Seen How Small X-ray Inspection Systems Are Now?
    by Kate Bertrand Connolly 1 on October 4, 2022 at 9:09 pm

    Today’s compact X-ray systems provide big product safety assurance in a little footprint. […]

  • Breaking News in Flexible Packaging
    by Rick Lingle on October 4, 2022 at 6:08 pm

    CadburyUK sharing bars wrapped in a world's first, shelf-life-extending food film, 50% PCR flexible packaging, converting trends, Henkel's fully circular packaging. […]

  • 5 (Not So Secret) Elements of Successful Club Store Packaging
    by Michael Carrier on October 4, 2022 at 4:51 pm

    Follow Costco’s 5 x 5 Rule for creating great club store packaging designs and see your product sales soar. […]

  • What’s New in Label Sustainability?
    by Rick Lingle on October 4, 2022 at 3:32 pm

    Wood labels, thinner substrates, super-efficient metallization, and more options that support recycling are trending. […]

  • Hand-Held Thickness Gauge for Plant or Lab Is Smart and Precise
    by Rick Lingle , Kate Bertrand Connolly 1 on October 4, 2022 at 12:51 pm

    ThicknessPen from Agr Intl. is an easy-to-use thickness-measurement tool for bottles, plastic thermoforms, injection-molded parts, and more. […]

  • EPA Celebrates Children’s Health Month, Highlighting Unprecedented Investment in Protecting Children’s Health
    by Office of the Administrator (AO) on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    WASHINGTON - October is Children’s Health Month and this year the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is spotlighting the historic resources advancing protection of children’s environmental health. The EPA is committed to protecting children at all stages and in all communities. “Protecting the health of our children and the environment where they live, learn and play is central to EPA’s mission, especially when it comes to children in overburdened and underserved areas,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “As we mark Children’s Health Month, I’m honored to highlight EPA’s work to protect children’s health and the historic level of funding from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and Inflation Reduction Act, that will bolster these efforts to deliver clean air, clean water and healthy lands for our children.”  EPA understands that early exposures to pollution can affect health later in life. At EPA, the Office of Children’s Health Protection works across Agency programs to identify and address health disparities so that all children, no matter their zip code, race, or income, can be protected equally under the law. EPA’s Children’s Health Policy and Strategic Plan ensures that the Agency considers environmental impacts at all stages, starting from maternal health, infancy, adolescence, and into early adulthood. Under the Biden-Harris Administration, EPA has advanced programs to protect children’s health with the support of historic funding from the American Rescue Plan and the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. EPA expects to take further protective actions with support from the Inflation Reduction Act, including providing grants and technical assistance to improve indoor air quality in schools. EPA initiatives to protect children’s health include: EPA’s Clean Bus Program will invest $5 billion over the next 5 years to replace existing diesel school buses with zero-emission and low-emission models resulting in reduced greenhouse gas emissions and other air pollutants that are harmful to children’s health. Distribution of $2 million from the American Rescue Plan to communities to address disproportionate environmental or public health harms and risks to children in underserved communities. EPA announced winners of the Let’s Talk About Heat Challenge, a competition focused on innovative communication strategies to warn people, including children, of the risks of extreme heat and provide solutions on how to keep safe during the hottest days. EPA published revised factsheets on climate change to explain its impacts on maternal and children’s health. EPA commissioned a National Academy of Science Workshop focused on children’s environmental health and future priorities that can be viewed online. The Agency revamped the Children’s Health Month webpage with useful children’s environmental health resources and tools for those who wish to get involved this October. Visit EPA’s Children’s Health webpage to learn more about the Agency’s work to protect children’s environmental health. […]

  • EPA Finalizes Cleanup Plan to Address Additional Contaminated Groundwater in the Olean Well Field Superfund Site in Cattaraugus County, New York
    by Region 02 on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    NEW YORK – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has finalized its plan to inject non-toxic materials into constructed wells to break down the hazardous contamination in groundwater across several areas south of the former AVX Corporation (AVX) property at the Olean Well Field Superfund site in Olean, New York. "Using this technique, EPA will speed up the groundwater cleanup by utilizing in-situ treatment, which uses various minerals and bacteria to spur the decontamination of harmful compounds found in contaminated groundwater,” said EPA Regional Administrator Lisa F. Garcia. "In this case, EPA can use nature to help prod things along; at the same time, we continue to monitor to make sure the technology works." The cleanup technique method supplements the natural process of breaking down the contamination over time. The cleanup includes long-term monitoring to ensure the cleanup is working as intended. The Olean Well Field Superfund site contains various wells, homes, and manufacturing facilities. Earlier industrial operations at the AVX property, as well as three other facilities that EPA considers sources of site contamination, resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater with trichloroethylene, 1,4-dioxane, and other volatile organic compounds. The contaminants migrated from the AVX property in groundwater south of the AVX property. As a result of the contamination at all four facilities, EPA added the site to the Superfund list in 1983. Since that time, several investigations led to cleanup remedies for the four source facilities and nearby impacted groundwater, most of which are being implemented by potentially responsible parties for the site. On July 15, 2022, EPA proposed this cleanup plan to the public and held a public meeting at the Cattaraugus County Campus of Jamestown Community College on July 27, 2022, to explain the plan and take comments. The Record of Decision released today addresses the comments received and formalizes EPA’s selected cleanup plan. Visit the Olean Well Field Superfund site profile page for additional background and to view the Record of Decision. Follow EPA Region 2 on Twitter and visit our Facebook page. For more information about EPA Region 2, visit our website. 22-077 […]

  • Arizona Company to Pay $182K Penalty to Settle Clean Air Act Claims at its Phoenix Facility
    by Region 09 on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    SAN FRANCISCO – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a settlement with Reddy Ice Phoenix for EPA’s Clean Air Act (CAA) findings at its Phoenix‑based facility. The company will pay $182,659 in civil penalties. Following an EPA inspection of Reddy Ice’s Phoenix-based ice manufacturing facility in June 2019, EPA determined that Reddy Ice failed to comply with Clean Air Act Section 112(r) rules to prevent accidental release, which requires that facilities storing more than 10,000 pounds of anhydrous ammonia are properly designed, operated, and maintained to minimize the risk of an accidental release. Specifically, EPA determined that Reddy Ice failed to properly design its refrigeration system to comply with applicable design codes and standards, maintain inspection and testing records on certain equipment, correct engineering control deficiencies related to ammonia detectors, emergency exhaust fans, and alarms, and did not act upon compliance audit findings. “It is every company’s responsibility to ensure compliance with the law, including critical safety regulations under the Clean Air Act for handling dangerous chemicals like anhydrous ammonia,” said EPA Southwest Regional Administrator Martha Guzman. “Failure to do so can endanger public health and safety, especially for those in underserved and vulnerable communities close to facilities with ammonia refrigeration systems.” Anhydrous ammonia can cause serious, often irreversible health effects when released. In addition to potential harmful effects from inhalation of or skin contact with this substance, it is highly flammable. Anhydrous ammonia is considered an extremely hazardous substance. About Clean Air Act Section 112(r): Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act requires companies of all sizes that use certain listed regulated flammable and toxic substances to develop and implement a Risk Management Program. A properly developed Risk Management Program includes: A hazard assessment that details the potential effects of an accidental release, an accident history of the last five years, and an evaluation of worst-case and alternative accidental release scenarios. A prevention program that includes safety precautions and maintenance, monitoring, and employee training measures. An emergency response program that spells out emergency health care, employee training measures and procedures for informing the public and response agencies (e.g., the fire department) should an accident occur. About Anhydrous Ammonia Accidents Thousands of facilities nationwide make, use, and store extremely hazardous substances, including anhydrous ammonia. Catastrophic accidents, historically about 150 each year, at facilities, which include ammonia refrigeration facilities, result in fatalities and serious injuries, evacuations, and other harm to human health and the environment. EPA inspects these facilities as part of the Agency’s National Compliance Initiative, which seeks to reduce risk to human health and the environment by decreasing the likelihood of accidental releases and mitigating the consequences of chemical accidents. For more information on reporting possible violations of environmental laws and regulations visit EPA’s enforcement reporting website. For more information on Clean Air Act Section 112(r) visit EPA’s Fact Sheet: Clean Air Act Section 112(r): Accidental Release Prevention / Risk Management Plan Rule website. Learn more about EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. Connect with us on Facebook and on Twitter. […]

  • EPA begins demolition and cleanup of Davison Road site in Flint, Michigan
    by Region 05 on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    CHICAGO (October 4, 2022) – Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will begin demolition of a former corner store at 1815 Davison Rd. in Flint, Michigan. EPA anticipates the cleanup, including the removal of asbestos-contaminated debris, will be completed by the end of November.Following a November 2020 fire that damaged the building, its current owner, the Genesee County Land Bank Authority, requested EPA’s assistance. EPA will demolish the structure ruins and remove asbestos-containing material at the property. The cleanup involves: Transport and disposal of the asbestos-contaminated waste at an approved facility; Following a safety plan, including air monitoring to protect the health of workers and the public. The construction will not cause road closures, but EPA does expect increased traffic for about two weeks as the asbestos is removed. After EPA’s cleanup is completed, the Land Bank will be able to safely evaluate the property for potential redevelopment. To learn more, please visit EPA’s website. […]

  • EPA to Continue Soil and Groundwater Cleanup at the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site in NJ
    by Region 02 on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    NEW YORK – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has finalized its plan to address the soil and groundwater contamination associated with an industrial property within the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination site. The contaminated groundwater is also a source of chemical vapors potentially entering homes and businesses in the Townships of Cinnaminson and Delran, N.J. "EPA will remove the contaminated soil – which is contaminating groundwater – and will treat that groundwater to reduce contaminants that are also causing harmful vapors that can get into buildings," said EPA Regional Administrator Lisa F. Garcia. "EPA is committed to delivering a long-term cleanup solution, and today's decision brings us one step closer to delivering on that promise." EPA's finalized plan calls for removing contaminated soil and replacing it with clean backfill. The plan includes a groundwater cleanup technique called in-situ chemical treatment, where chemicals are injected into the area with the highest amount of contamination to break down and decrease the contamination over time. The contamination in the soil and groundwater is causing harmful vapors to enter some homes through a process called vapor intrusion. EPA will continue to investigate vapor intrusion and address it where it is found by installing specialized vapor mitigation systems, similar to radon systems, in homes. EPA is also monitoring the groundwater in the long term to ensure the cleanup is working as intended. Residents don’t drink contaminated groundwater but get their drinking water from a private water company. The Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Superfund site is located in the Townships of Cinnaminson and Delran in Burlington County, N.J. The site covers approximately 400 acres and includes residential properties, light to heavy industrial properties and historical landfill properties. During an investigation as part of a closure plan for the landfills by the state in the early 1980s, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection discovered soil and groundwater contaminants, including trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1, 2-dichloroethene (cis-1, 2-DCE), benzene and arsenic. EPA placed the site on the Superfund National Priorities List in 1986. Due to the nature and complexity of the contamination at the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Superfund site, the investigations and cleanup of the site have been conducted in four phases, otherwise known as Operable Units. This final cleanup plan focuses on Operable Unit 3, which includes the soil and groundwater contamination associated with an industrial property located on the northwestern part of the site and the vapor intrusion in nearby residential developments. On August 1, 2022, EPA released its proposed cleanup plan to the public and held a virtual public meeting on August 10, 2022, to explain the plan and take comments. The Record of Decision released today addresses the comments received during the public comment period and formalizes EPA’s selected cleanup plan. Visit the Cinnaminson Groundwater Contamination Site profile page for additional background and to view the Record of Decision.  Follow EPA Region 2 on Twitter and visit our Facebook page. For more information about EPA Region 2, visit our website. 22-078 […]

  • La EPA anuncia una iniciativa de difusión nacional para reducir la exposición al plomo en comunidades marginadas
    by Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP) on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    WASHINGTON (4 de octubre de 2022) – Como parte del compromiso de la Administración Biden-Harris de promover la justicia ambiental, la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de Estados Unidos (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés) lanza por segundo año una iniciativa nacional de capacitación y divulgación centrada en reducir la exposición infantil al plomo. El programa destinado a Mejorar las Prácticas de Trabajo Seguras con el Plomo Mediante Educación y Alcance Público (Enhancing Lead-Safe Work Practices through Education and Outreach, ELSWPEO, por sus siglas en inglés), llega ahora que la EPA marca el inicio del Mes de la Salud Infantil en octubre y se prepara para la Semana Nacional de Prevención del Envenenamiento por Plomo más adelante este mes. La EPA ofrecerá capacitaciones gratuitas sobre prácticas de trabajo seguras con el plomo a contratistas en 10 comunidades en los Estados Unidos y sus territorios donde las personas enfrentan riesgos elevados de pintura a base de plomo. Además, la EPA involucrará a los miembros y líderes de la comunidad en estrategias para proteger a los niños de la exposición al plomo. Este esfuerzo de compromiso complementará la inversión histórica de $4 mil millones para reducir la exposición al plomo conforme a la Ley Bipartidista de Infraestructura del Presidente Biden y apoyará el compromiso de la Administración Biden-Harris de garantizar que todos los estadounidenses puedan vivir en hogares saludables. “Esta iniciativa demuestra cómo la colaboración entre los gobiernos y las organizaciones nacionales, estatales, locales y tribales puede proteger a las comunidades marginadas de la exposición a sustancias químicas tóxicas como el plomo”, señaló Michal Freedhoff, administrador asistente de la Oficina de Seguridad Química y Prevención de la Contaminación. “Muchas comunidades en los Estados Unidos todavía tienen riesgo de exponerse al plomo, y estamos comprometidos a reducirlo y prevenirlo”. Durante los esfuerzos de alcance público de ELSWPEO a 11 comunidades en 2021, esta iniciativa de la EPA certificó a 282 contratistas en prácticas de trabajo seguras con el plomo y educó a 245 líderes comunitarios y 170 miembros de la comunidad con información sobre la exposición al plomo en la infancia. Continuando tras este éxito, la EPA está trabajando con numerosos socios para implementar el programa de ELSWPEO por segundo año como parte de sus actividades para la Semana Nacional de Prevención del Envenenamiento por Plomo. Este año, la EPA facilitará capacitaciones de certificación para renovación, reparación y pintura (RRP) seguras con el plomo y sesiones del Programa de Concientización sobre el Plomo en Stratford, Connecticut; Loíza, Puerto Rico; Arecibo, Puerto Rico; Newark, Nueva Jersey; Portsmouth, Virginia; Miami, Florida; Toledo, Ohio; St. Louis, Missouri; Billings, Montana (con un enfoque en los miembros tribales); y Sacramento, California. Estas comunidades tienen problemas conocidos de exposición al plomo y tienen una necesidad demostrada de contar con contratistas certificados de RRP. ELSWPEO tiene un enfoque doble para reducir la exposición infantil al plomo: Capacitación de RRP para contratistas: La EPA proporcionará capacitaciones gratuitas para que los contratistas obtengan la certificación RRP segura con el plomo, en inglés o español, dependiendo de las necesidades de la comunidad seleccionada. En general, la EPA exige que toda persona a quien se le pague para realizar trabajos que perturben la pintura en viviendas e instalaciones ocupadas por niños construidas antes de 1978 sea certificada como segura para trabajar con plomo por la EPA o por un estado o tribu con autorización de la EPA. Sesiones del Programa de Concientización sobre el Plomo: En colaboración con socios locales, la EPA facilitará sesiones educativas gratuitas para los líderes comunitarios y el público en general utilizando el Plan de estudios de Concientización sobre el plomo en los terrenos indígenas: ¡Mantener sanos a nuestros niños! (comúnmente conocido como el Plan de Concientización sobre el Plomo), un conjunto de herramientas educativas que proporcionan recursos prácticos para reducir la exposición al plomo en la infancia. Como novedad este año, la EPA ofrecerá varias sesiones virtuales y presenciales personalizadas para algunas de las comunidades ELSWPEO de este año. El Plan de Concientización sobre el Plomo consta de cuatro módulos que incluyen planes de lecciones, hojas de trabajo, mensajes clave, diapositivas de presentación y hojas de actividades para niños a fin de que los líderes comunitarios y otros instructores las usen para mejorar la conciencia pública. La EPA diseñó los materiales curriculares con más de 200 socios tribales para que se adapten a todas las comunidades. Se ofrecerán dos sesiones. La sesión de Capacitación de Instructores para el Plan de Concientización sobre el Plomo está diseñada para equipar a los líderes comunitarios de tal modo que puedan educar a sus comunidades sobre el plomo, la exposición al plomo y las medidas destinadas a reducir y prevenir la exposición infantil. La sesión Entender el plomo es para miembros de la comunidad interesados en conocer más sobre el plomo, la exposición al plomo y las medidas para reducir su exposición. Puede encontrar más información sobre ELSWPEO, fechas y lugares de capacitación de RRP y sesiones del Plan de Concientización sobre el Plomo en epa.gov/lead/local-training-and-outreach. La información sobre ELSWPEO en español se puede encontrar en: https://espanol.epa.gov/plomo/capacitacion-y-alcance-publico-local &nbs […]

  • EPA Announces Nationwide Outreach Initiative to Reduce Lead Exposure in Underserved Communities
    by Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP) on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    WASHINGTON (October 4, 2022) – As part of the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to advance environmental justice, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is launching for the second year a nationwide training and outreach initiative focused on reducing childhood lead exposure. The program, Enhancing Lead-Safe Work Practices through Education and Outreach (ELSWPEO), comes as EPA marks the start of Children’s Health Month in October and prepares for National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week later this month. EPA will offer free trainings on lead-safe work practices to contractors in 10 communities across the United States and its territories where people face elevated risks from lead-based paint. In addition, EPA will engage community members and leaders on strategies for protecting children from lead exposure. This engagement effort will complement the historic investment of $4 billion to reduce lead exposure from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and support the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to ensuring all Americans can live in healthy homes. “This initiative demonstrates how collaboration between national, state, local and Tribal governments and organizations can protect underserved communities from exposure to toxic chemicals like lead,” said Michal Freedhoff, Assistant Administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “Many communities across the U.S. are still at risk for lead exposure, and we are committed to lowering and preventing it.” During ELSWPEO outreach to 11 communities in 2021, this EPA initiative certified 282 contractors in lead-safe work practices and educated 245 community leaders and 170 community members with information about childhood lead exposure. Building on this success, EPA is working with numerous partners to implement ELSWPEO for its second year as part of its activities for National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week. This year, EPA will facilitate renovation, repair and painting (RRP) lead-safe certification trainings and Lead Awareness Curriculum sessions in Stratford, Connecticut; Loíza, Puerto Rico; Arecibo, Puerto Rico; Newark, New Jersey; Portsmouth, Virginia; Miami, Florida; Toledo, Ohio; St. Louis, Missouri; Billings, Montana (with a focus on tribal members); and Sacramento, California. These communities have known lead exposure issues, and have a demonstrated need for RRP-certified contractors. ELSWPEO has a two-pronged approach to reduce childhood lead exposure: Lead RRP training for contractors: EPA will provide free trainings for contractors to become RRP lead-safe certified, in English or Spanish, depending on the needs of the selected community. In general, EPA requires anyone who is paid to perform work that disturbs paint in housing and child-occupied facilities built before 1978 to be lead-safe certified by EPA or an EPA-authorized state or tribe.   Lead Awareness Curriculum sessions: In collaboration with local partners, EPA will facilitate free educational sessions for community leaders and the general public using the Lead Awareness in Indian Country: Keeping our Children Healthy! Curriculum (commonly referred to as the Lead Awareness Curriculum), a set of educational tools that provide practical resources to reduce childhood lead exposure. New this year, EPA will offer several virtual and in-person sessions customized for some of this year’s ELSWPEO communities. The Lead Awareness Curriculum consists of four modules that include lesson plans, worksheets, key messages, presentation slides, and kids’ activity sheets for community leaders and other instructors to use to improve public awareness. EPA designed the curriculum materials with more than 200 tribal partners to be adaptable to all communities.Two sessions will be offered. The Lead Awareness Curriculum Train-the-Trainer session is designed to equip community leaders to educate their communities about lead, lead exposure, and actions to reduce and prevent childhood exposure. The Understanding Lead session is for community members interested in learning more about lead, lead exposure, and actions to reduce their exposure. Learn more about ELSWPEO, RRP training dates and locations, and Lead Awareness Curriculum sessions Information on ELSWPEO in Spanis […]

  • USIBWC Awards Contract to Kick Off San Diego - Tijuana Water Infrastructure Projects
    by Region 09 on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    United States Commissioner Maria-Elena Giner of the International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico (IBWC) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regional Administrator Martha Guzman today announced the U.S. Section of the Commission (USIBWC) has awarded a $4,659,432.00 contract to Arcadis, U.S., Inc. to start work on border water infrastructure improvements at San Diego, California – Tijuana, Baja California. This marks important progress toward implementing a recently signed binational IBWC agreement known as Minute No. 328, “Sanitation Infrastructure Projects in San Diego, California – Tijuana, Baja California for Immediate Implementation and for Future Development,”   The contract will lay the groundwork to double the size of the USIBWC’s South Bay International Wastewater Treatment Plant (SBIWTP) in San Diego, California, which currently provides treatment to U.S. standards for 25 million gallons per day of wastewater from Tijuana. Under Minute 328, this plant expansion is part of a package of projects in both countries expected to result in a 50% reduction in the number of days of transborder wastewater flow in the Tijuana River and an 80% reduction in the volume of untreated wastewater discharged to the Pacific Ocean six miles south of the border. “This is an important first step to fix the region’s border sanitation problem,” said Commissioner Giner.  “This work will prepare us to use available funds efficiently and to move quickly to the next phase – design and construction of the expanded treatment plant. I am committed to transparency in how we implement this project and to keep our stakeholders informed.” “This contract represents a critical step towards controlling the transborder pollution that has long burdened communities in the region and harmed Tijuana River Valley ecosystems” said EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Martha Guzman. “The effort to expand the South Bay International Wastewater Treatment Plant, which this contract supports, will mean residents on both sides of the border will have a healthier, cleaner environment for years to come.” Under the contract, Arcadis will: Determine required upgrades and repairs to the existing plant Provide professional recommendation on the maximum size of the plant expansion with available funding Review and recommend the best procurement method for design and construction of the plant and any required upgrades to the existing plant Prepare design and construction cost estimates Prepare a detailed project scope of work for the plant expansion This Phase 1 pre-design work will enable USIBWC to solicit bids for design of the SBIWTP expansion by summer 2023. The contractor may also provide Program Management and deliverable reviews as part of the Design and Construction phases.   The SBIWTP expansion is a major element of the Minute 328 projects, which also include constructing a new treatment plant in Mexico and rehabilitating and replacing aging sewer lines and pump stations in Tijuana. […]

  • EPA releases 2-year milestone evaluations on Chesapeake Bay cleanup effort; cites challenges, progress, potential
    by Region 03 on October 4, 2022 at 12:00 pm

    PHILADELPHIA (Oct. 4, 2022) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced the results of its evaluation of the Chesapeake Bay jurisdictions’ two-year milestones today, noting that although most of the Bay states are not on track to meet the 2025 water quality restoration goals, 2022 saw new significant successes at the state level that will improve the restoration trajectory. The two-year milestone reports are prepared by the Chesapeake Bay jurisdictions – Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. These two-year milestone reports represent key check-in points on the way to having all pollutant reduction measures in place by 2025, a goal established by the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) Partnership.  The CBP Partnership is composed of the seven Bay jurisdictions, and dozens of local governments, federal partners, organizations and academic institutions. “Although the results are mixed overall, there are more positive developments in the mix than ever. Most of the partnership is not on track for the 2025 targets, but we are encouraged by significant recent progress made in the states,” said EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Adam Ortiz. “We applaud the historic new programs, laws, and funding in Pennsylvania to help farmers.  Those achievements will help us accelerate restoration in the local streams that need it the most.” Based on EPA’s review, the District of Columbia and West Virginia are on track to meet their overall cleanup goals by 2025, but the other jurisdictions are not on track to meet all the cleanup goals. “We applaud West Virginia and the District of Columbia, and we will continue to partner with the other states to keep accelerating to expand on our successes,” said Ortiz. “More than two decades ago, virtually no streams were getting healthier. Now 40% of them are getting better thanks to our interstate collaboration.” Overall, the Partnership has already achieved 100% of targeted sediment reductions, and practices are in place to achieve 49% of the nitrogen reductions and 64% of the phosphorus reductions. “We are dedicated to reducing pollution entering the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and we also understand the complexities each state faces with technical assistance, data verification, staffing and funding,” added Chesapeake Bay Program Director Dr. Kandis Boyd.  “Although there is good news, there are also new challenges – such as addressing our evolving climate, increased population in the watershed, and advancing air/land/water monitoring and modeling – that hinder sustainable environmental and economic progress. We are committed to working with our partner states and agencies to address these challenges to restore our national treasure.”For more details on the milestone reports and ongoing Bay cleanup efforts, visit https://www.epa.gov/chesapeake-bay-tmd […]